Cooking the Perfect Pit Boss Brisket Recipe (with 3 Smokers)

If you’re a fan of BBQ and slow-cooked meats, you’ll love this Pit Boss Brisket recipe. Brisket is a tough cut of meat that requires low and slow cooking to become tender and flavorful, and smoking it is one of the best ways to achieve mouthwatering results. In this article, we’ll walk you through the process of smoking a brisket using a Pellet, Electric, or Charcoal smoker, as well as provide tips and tricks for getting the best results every time. Whether you’re a seasoned BBQ pro or a beginner looking to try your hand at smoking, this recipe is sure to be a hit. So grab your Pit Boss pellet grill and let’s get started!

Why you’ll love this recipe

A delicious dish made by using the Pit Boss Brisket Recipe
A delicious dish made by using the Pit Boss Brisket Recipe

The meat turns out so juicy and flavorful, and the smoke flavor is just perfect. Plus, the recipe is super easy to follow, even if you’re new to smoking. I love that it uses a whole packer brisket, too – that way, you have plenty of leftovers to enjoy the next day. Whether you’re making sandwiches, burnt ends, or just eating the brisket on its own, it’s always a hit. So if you haven’t given it a try yet, I highly recommend it. Your taste buds (and your BBQ-loving friends and family) will thank you!

Choosing the Right Brisket for Your Recipe

When it comes to selecting the right brisket for your recipe, there are a few key factors to consider. First and foremost, you’ll want to choose a brisket with good marbling – that is, a healthy layer of fat throughout the meat. This will help to keep the brisket moist and flavorful as it cooks, and also contribute to the characteristic “smoke ring” that is a hallmark of great BBQ.

One of the best options for a juicy and flavorful brisket is a wagyu brisket, which is known for its high fat content and distinctive marbling. However, any whole packer brisket (which includes both the “flat cut” and the “point” or “deckle”) will work well for smoking, as long as it has good marbling and a nice “fat cap” on top. You can usually find whole packer briskets at your local grocery store, or order one online for delivery.

Prepping the Brisket for Smoking

Before you begin the cooking process, it’s important to properly prepare your brisket for the smoker. Start by bringing the brisket to room temperature, which will help it cook more evenly. Then, using a sharp knife, remove any excess fat or connective tissue from the fat side of the brisket, taking care not to cut into the meat itself. This is especially important if it’s your first time cooking a brisket, as excess fat can cause the meat to become too greasy or overcooked.

Next, mix up a batch of your favorite brisket rub using ingredients like garlic powder, black pepper, kosher salt, and any other seasonings you prefer. Rub this mixture all over the surface of the meat, taking care to work it into any crevices or folds. Finally, drizzle the brisket with a little olive oil and a splash of apple cider vinegar or Worcestershire sauce, then mist it lightly with a spray bottle filled with beef broth. This will help to keep the brisket moist and flavorful as it smokes.

Cooking the Brisket in a Pellet Smoker

Ingredients for the Pit Boss Brisket Recipe
Ingredients for the Pit Boss Brisket Recipe

If you’re using a pellet smoker (such as a Pit Boss pellet grill) to cook your brisket, the process is relatively straightforward. First, preheat your smoker to the desired temperature (generally between 225-250 degrees F) and fill the hopper with your choice of wood pellets. Mesquite, oak, and hickory are all good options for smoking brisket, and will give the meat a nice, smoky flavor. Experiment with different types of wood to find the smoke setting that works best for you.

Once the smoker is preheated and the pellets are smoking, place the prepared brisket on the grill grates, fat side up. Insert a temperature probe into the thickest part of the meat, making sure not to touch the bone. This will allow you to monitor the internal temperature of the brisket as it cooks, ensuring that it reaches the desired doneness.

As the brisket cooks, be sure to maintain a consistent temperature in the smoker, adding more wood pellets as needed to keep the smoke going. The total cooking time will vary depending on the size of your brisket and the desired level of doneness, but as a general rule of thumb, you can expect to cook a brisket for around 1-2 hours per pound. This may seem like a long cook time, but trust us – the end result is worth it!

During the cooking process, you may encounter something called the “brisket stall,” which is when the internal temperature of the meat plateaus and seems to stop rising. This is caused by the rendering of the fat and connective tissue in the brisket, and is a normal part of the smoking process. To help get past the stall, you can wrap the brisket in aluminum foil or peach butcher paper (a.k.a. the “Texas crutch”) to help trap in heat and moisture.

Once the internal temperature of the brisket reaches around 200-205 degrees F (as measured by an instant-read thermometer or meat thermometer), it should be ready to come off the smoker. Remove the brisket from the grill and let it rest for at least 30 minutes before slicing, allowing the juices to redistribute throughout the meat. This will help to ensure that the brisket is juicy and tender when you serve it.

Cooking the Brisket in an Electric Smoker

Cooking a brisket in an electric smoker (such as a Pit Boss grill) is very similar to cooking it in a pellet smoker. The main difference is that you won’t need to worry about adding wood pellets or maintaining a constant temperature, as these tasks are handled automatically by the smoker. This can be a great option for those who are new to smoking, as it takes some of the guesswork out of the process.

To cook a brisket in an electric smoker, simply preheat the smoker to the desired temperature (again, around 225-250 degrees F is a good range), then place the prepared brisket on the grill grates, fat side up. Insert a temperature probe into the meat, as described above, and let the smoker do its thing.

As with a pellet smoker, the cooking time will vary depending on the size of your brisket and the desired level of doneness. You may need to use the “Texas crutch” method to help get past the brisket stall, as described above. Once the internal temperature reaches around 200-205 degrees F, remove the brisket from the smoker and let it rest before slicing and serving.

Cooking the Brisket in a Charcoal Smoker

Cooking a brisket in a charcoal smoker requires a little more hands-on attention, but can be well worth the effort for the unique flavor it imparts to the meat. To get started, preheat your smoker to the desired temperature (once again, 225-250 degrees F is a good range), then add a handful of wood chips to the coals to create a smoky flavor.

Place the prepared brisket on the grill grates, fat side up, and insert a temperature probe into the meat. Maintain a consistent temperature in the smoker by adding more coals and wood chips as needed, and be prepared to “babysit” the brisket a bit more closely than you would with a pellet or electric smoker. This is where a good heat source, such as a charcoal chimney starter, can come in handy.

As with the other smoking methods, the cooking time will depend on the size of your brisket and the desired level of doneness. You may need to use the “Texas crutch” method to help get past the brisket stall, as described above. Once the internal temperature reaches around 200-205 degrees F, remove the brisket from the smoker and let it rest before slicing and serving.

Finishing and Serving Your Smoked Brisket

After you’ve cooked your brisket to perfection, it’s time to slice and serve it up. Using a sharp knife, slice the brisket into thin slices against the grain, taking care to remove any remaining excess fat or connective tissue as you go. Serve the slices on a cutting board, along with any additional BBQ sauce or seasoning that you prefer.

One of the great things about smoked brisket is that it tastes even better the next day, so if you have any leftovers, be sure to store them in the fridge (wrapped in plastic wrap or aluminum foil) and enjoy them as sandwiches or on their own the next day. If you want to take your leftovers to the next level, consider turning them into “burnt ends” – bite-sized pieces of brisket that are caramelized in BBQ sauce and then smoked again until tender and flavorful.

And there you have it – a perfectly cooked pit boss brisket recipe that is sure to impress your friends and family. Whether you’re a seasoned BBQ pro or a first-time smoker, with the right tools and techniques, you can achieve mouth-watering results every time. Happy cooking!

Frequently Asked Questions

Is it a great thing to have extra fat on a brisket?

A: While a little bit of fat is necessary to help keep a brisket moist and flavorful as it cooks, having too much extra fat can actually be a hindrance. Excess fat can cause the meat to become greasy or overcooked, and can also make it more difficult to achieve a nice smoke ring on the surface of the meat. For these reasons, it’s generally a good idea to remove any excess fat or connective tissue from the fat side of the brisket before cooking it.

Can I use a full packer brisket for this recipe?

A: Yes, a full packer brisket (which includes both the “flat cut” and the “point” or “deckle”) is an excellent choice for this recipe. Just be sure to remove any excess fat or connective tissue before seasoning and cooking the brisket, as described in the recipe.

Is smoking the only way to cook a brisket?

No, smoking is not the only way to cook a brisket. Other methods include grilling and braising, both of which can produce delicious results. Grilling is a good option for those who want to cook their brisket quickly, as it can be done in a relatively short amount of time. Braising, on the other hand, is a slow-cooking method that involves cooking the meat in a liquid (such as beef broth or apple juice) at a low temperature. This method is especially good for tough cuts of meat, as it helps to tenderize the meat and make it more flavorful.

Can I use a whole brisket instead of just the flat cut in this recipe?

Yes, you can use a whole brisket (which includes both the flat cut and the point or deckle) in this recipe. Just be sure to remove any excess fat or connective tissue before seasoning and cooking the brisket, as described in the recipe.

Can I cook the brisket in a Pit Boss pellet grill?

Yes, you can cook a brisket in a Pit Boss pellet grill with great results. In fact, a pellet grill is one of the best types of smokers to use for cooking a brisket, as it is relatively hands-off and produces consistent results every time. Just be sure to follow the recipe and maintain a consistent temperature in the grill, adding more wood pellets as needed to keep the smoke going.

Is it a good option to use an electric smoker for this recipe?

Using an electric smoker (such as a Pit Boss grill) is a good option for cooking a brisket, especially for those who are new to smoking. These types of smokers are relatively hands-off and produce consistent results every time, making them a great choice for novice smokers. Just be sure to follow the recipe and maintain a consistent temperature in the smoker, and you’ll be on your way to a perfectly cooked brisket.

A delicious dish made by using the Pit Boss Brisket Recipe

Pit Boss Brisket Recipe

Shara
Learn how to smoke a juicy and flavorful brisket using a pellet, electric, or charcoal smoker.
5 from 1 vote
Prep Time 20 mins
Cook Time 12 hrs
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Servings 10

Equipment

  • Smoker (pellet, electric, or charcoal)
  • Meat thermometer
  • Aluminum foil or peach butcher paper (optional)

Ingredients
  

  • 1 5-7 lb brisket
  • 1-2 cups dry rub or BBQ seasoning depending on the size of the brisket
  • 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar or apple juice optional
  • 1-2 cups wood chips or wood pellets depending on the size of the smoker and the desired level of smoke flavor

Instructions
 

  • Preheat your smoker to 225-250 degrees F.
  • Season the brisket with a dry rub or BBQ seasoning, and place it on the grill grates, fat side up.
  • If using a pellet or electric smoker, add wood chips or wood pellets to the smoker to add a smoky flavor.
  • Insert a temperature probe into the thickest part of the brisket.
  • Let the brisket cook until the internal temperature reaches around 200-205 degrees F. This may take anywhere from 8-12 hours or more, depending on the size of the brisket and the desired level of doneness.
  • If using the “Texas crutch” method, wrap the brisket in aluminum foil or peach butcher paper once it reaches an internal temperature of around 150-160 degrees F.
  • Once the brisket is done cooking, remove it from the smoker and let it rest for at least 30 minutes before slicing and serving.

Notes

Maintain a consistent temperature in the smoker by adding more coals or wood chips as needed.
If using a charcoal smoker, you may need to “babysit” the brisket more closely than with a pellet or electric smoker.
For extra flavor, you can baste the brisket with a mixture of apple cider vinegar or apple juice and water as it cooks.
Leftovers can be stored in the fridge and enjoyed the next day as sandwiches, burnt ends, or on their own.
Keyword Pit Boss Brisket Recipe
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